steampunk


The first book in a planned steampunk series.

Publication year: 2017
Format: ebook
Page count: 122

This short book starts the story of two young women in a country at war. Both women are interested in mechanics but don’t think they can really pursue it for real. But when men are called to war, women get chances they otherwise wouldn’t.

Alicia Reynard is a farm girl with a very active imagination and eye for mechanical work. Her father has always encouraged her and even bought some books for her, even though they’re very expensive. She loves to draw and read. When the war against a neighboring country heats up, their small earnings go down and her father has to find another employment. But then the University at the capital calls for female students. It’s very expensive but it might also be the only chance Alicia will have.

Lady Elena Singleton was born into a wealthy noble family but she has to keep up with appearances. This means getting married which is she doesn’t want to do. She studies mechanical engineering secretly and thinks that her life will end when she’s forced to marry some bore. However, her grandmother smuggles science books to her and encourages her to dream. When the university calls for female students, Elena’s mother forbids her to go.

This is quite a gentle story with little adversity to the women. Alicia is encouraged by everyone around her. Elena’s mother is against Elena’s scientific interest but her grandmother is supportive. I liked the main and the supporting characters. Alicia’s mother goes through a more significant change than Alicia herself. However, we saw Alicia a lot more than Elena. In fact, when we saw Elena in the latter part of the book, through the eyes of someone else, she didn’t seem the same character.

The ending is abrupt although I wouldn’t call it a cliff-hanger. There’s no clear ending and we don’t know when the story will continue.

The culture feels like a Victorian one where women stay at home and most of the time don’t take part in any business or other public venture. But when men are sent to war, women all over must take over for the men. And nobody objects. This is what I have some trouble with, being a student of history.

The whole culture seems to be very practical about it. Only one person in the book objects, and that’s Elena’s mother, and her reasons are “respectability” and “tradition”. But if most people are alright with women working and being able to work just as well as men, why don’t capable women already run their own business (even in Middle Ages, a widow could take over her deceased husband’s business) or work alongside men or demand to be let into university? Historically, women’s work has been discouraged because most people thought women were simply incapable of any intelligent work and/or it’s the natural order etc. Nobody here said anything like that, which seems strange.

But I’m curious to see where this story will go.

Set in 1878 in Rapid City in Washington State, it’s a steampunk Western detective story.

Publication year: 2015
Format: print
Page count: 351
Publisher: TOR

Let’s get something out of the way: Karen Memory is a prostitute and she lives in a brothel. She’s also around 17 and not the youngest girl there. She’s also smart and loyal and cares for the other girls. But she prefers to work in Madame Damnable’s brothel to working in a factory, which was at the time dangerous and very dirty.

The book is Karen’s journal and so written in first person and with a dialect.

There are (at least) two main brothels in Rapid City. Hôtel Mon Cherie is run by Madame Damnable who doesn’t allow the girls to drink too much and keeps her place clean. The girls are like family to each other. Also, one of them was born a man. The girls also gather around at evenings, after the clients have gone, and read different sorts of books.

Then there’s Peter Bantle’s place where the girls are kept prisoners, underfed, and beaten. Unfortunately, Bantle is quite influential. One Chinese woman, Merry Lee, tries and sometimes succeeds in freeing Bantle’s girls.

The story starts when Merry Lee comes into Mon Cherie shot and supported by one of Bantle’s escaped slaves. Bantle follows with his goons but Karen and a couple of the other girls and Madame manage to send them away. But a war starts between the two brothels.

Also, a new marshal is in town following a man who murders prostitutes gruesomely. Marshal Bass Reeves is black and he isn’t going to get much help from the locals, except from Karen and her friends.

I really enjoyed this tale a lot. I did have difficulty with the language sometimes, though. I also really enjoyed the side characters and the references to earlier steampunk books, such as to Jules Verne’s books.

Fantasy book about a spy/librarian who works for the Library which has access points to many alternate worlds. To get books!

Publication year: 2016
Format: print
Page count: 329
Publisher: TOR

Irene is a junior Librarian in the Library which exists between alternate worlds. Her mission is to save books from various worlds. To do that, she often has to use cover identities and get into places where she shouldn’t be. The book starts with the end of one mission. After Irene returns to the Library, she’s immediately given her next assignment: to get one of the collected fairy tales of Grimm from an alternate world. She isn’t told what is special about it. Instead, her supervisor gives her a trainee, the handsome and mysterious Kai. She’s used to working alone, so she isn’t happy about it, but she can’t say no.

So, Kai and Irene head over to an alternate London to steal the book. However, the owner of the book has been murdered and the book stolen, so their mission becomes far more dangerous and difficult than they thought. Also, a famous private detective notices them, and Irene has to decide if she can trust him or not. Another shadowy character is Silver, a fae noble who is also after the book.

This setting has a wealth of possibilities and it fascinated me. However, Irene is pretty standard plucky heroine. She loves books and has a special love for detective stories. Her specialty seems to be more in spying and acting than fighting, though. She’s dedicated to the Library and its mission of preserving fiction from various alternate worlds. However, at the same time she doesn’t really know the senior Librarians nor does she know their real goals. Her beliefs about the Library and Librarians are challenged in the book, though. This clearly isn’t her first mission and references are made to her previous jobs, especially one involving a charming cat burglar and her fellow Librarian, Bradamant, which made her and Bradamant mortal enemies.

Kai is a very handsome and elegant young man who is more than you’d think at first glance. He’s a trainee who hasn’t yet sworn himself to the Library. This is his first fieldwork assignment. There’s no romance in the book, despite this obvious set up, which was very refreshing.

The Librarians use Language, the primal Language of everything. They use it to command stuff but they’re very limited in what they can do with it. The alternate worlds are battle grounds for order and chaos. Dragons are on the side of order (along with the Library) and the fae on the side of chaos. This London has steampunk technology side by side with vampires and werewolf, who aren’t hiding from the general public. Oh and time doesn’t flow inside the Library, so most of the Librarians are several decades or centuries old.

This was a fun book but clearly first in a series. There are hints about lot of things, such as just what the senior Librarians are up to and about the main villain, a former Librarian. However, the Librarians come across as very focused on books, to the exclusion of everything else, and even cruel towards people outside their company.

A non-fiction book about all things Steampunk: fashion, art, sub-culture, books.


Publication year: 2011
Format: print
Page count: 224
Publisher: Abrams Image

This book showcases the Steampunk sub-culture with lots of gorgeous pictures. It’s divided into six categories: the origin of steampunk, literature, art & craft, fashion & music, movies & tv, and the future.

For fiction, it covers only the basics. But the chapter of past gives a lot of information about H. G. Wells and Jules Verne who wrote the first books which can be described as Steampunk. Some other writers are included as well. I was particularly fascinated by the pulp stories written in American magazines because I’ve never heard of them before.

The fiction chapter gives an insight into how writers came up with steam powered Victorian stories in the first place. Not all writers can be in the book, so VanderMeer selected the most important ones, such as Blaylock, Michael Moorcock, Tim Powers, and K. W. Jeter. Others, such as Cherie Priest and Ekaterina Sedia, are also included.

This is a gorgeous book with lots of pictures of art, fashion, book covers, and more. The TV section brought to my attention a lot of TV shows and movies which I hadn’t know about. It was great to see that many fans, no matter if they’re writers or fashion tinkerers, like the punk, or revolution, of the movement and not just the aesthetics. After all, Victorian England did have its problems, too.

I think this would most interest people new to steampunk. While I’ve read or know about most of the books mentioned, I didn’t know much about the sub-culture, either in Japan or USA. There are a few Steampunk enthusiasts here in Finland, too, but I think they’re quite a small group.

This is a collection of seven retold fairy tales in steampunk settings. I wasn’t familiar with any of the authors before.

Publication year: 2016
Format: ebook
Page count: around 100

The Clockwork People by Angela Castillo: Mr. Streusel builds toys whom all the children love. He lovingly crafts a clockwork boy and calls it Pieter. Then Pieter starts to move in his own.

Perfection by Chris Champe: Mary used to be a wonderful pianist but she had an accident which left her weak and unable to play. Her husband builds automatons which move like humans but much of his time goes to support Mary. One day, Mary realizes that her piano has been taken away and she searches the labyrinthine house for it.

The Mech Oni and the Three-Inch Tinkerer by Leslie and David T. Allen: Issun Boshi was born to an elderly couple. He was wanted but he was also tiny, only three inches tall. When he’s sixteen, he leaves his parents to become a samurai.

The Copper Eyes by Allison Latzko: Oliver is the youngest son of his inventor mother. Unfortunately, his mother has lost her mind: she has built Oliver’s brothers into her inventions. Oliver has no choice but to run away.

Strawberry Sins by Heather White: Dr. Samuel Wolfe and Dr. Fermin have been working together to make a formula which will change a man to something else and back again. Unfortunately, the formula which is supposed to turn Wolfe back to a man didn’t work and he despairs. He feels his mind is starting to deteriorate. But then Fermin’s daughter appears and starts to help him.

The Yellow Butterfly by Ashley Capes: Takashi works in a factory for a cruel and demanding boss, Mr. Nishimura. But when Nishimura closes the factory, the former workers have to move or starve. Nishimura’s daughter tries to help the men but she might make things worse.

Aubrey in the World Above by Daniel Lind: Aubrey lives in a world where thieves are sent to the World Above and forced to serve the people there. Her mother has just been condemned and her cruel father forces her to witness how the giant beanstalk springs up and spirits her mother away.

I didn’t recognize all of these stories as familiar fairy tales but I did enjoy them even though none of them were exceptional. The most recognizable ones have interesting steampunk twists. Two of them are based on Japanese fairy tales which I’m not familiar with. Interestingly enough, I thought that Strawberry Sins was based on quite another story until I got the end of the book where each writer reveals the fairy tale his or her story is based on. The book has excerpts from some of the writers’ other books.

Most of these stories are pretty dark, but I guess that’s appropriate for stories with “punk” in them. A couple of them have actually a gothic horror feeling. They have cruel family members and mad scientists. Yet, they all have hope in them, too. “The Clockwork People” and “The Mech Oni and the Three-Inch Tinkerer” are the least grim and “The Copper Eyes” even has an amusing twist on the damsel in distress trope.

One short story and a novella about the adventures of Reginald Worcester and his gentleman’s automaton Reeves. Yes, it’s steampunk Wodehouse!

Publication year: 2011
Format: ebook
Page count: 145
Publisher: Book View Café

Humor isn’t easy to write. But this one I really liked. I haven’t actually read much Wodehouse (and I think all of them have been Finnish translations) but I’ve watched Jeeves and Wooster almost religiously. Reading this, I heard Bertie’s voice narrating and laughed out loud several times.

In the first story, Aunt Bertha sends Reggie to a country estate with the mission to end an engagement between Reggie’s cousin Herbert and Josephine Smith. However, the Crandle Castle is owned by an earl whose daughter Reggie has been engaged to previously and it didn’t end amicably, so Reggie doesn’t look forward to the task. Fortunately, he acquires a very useful automaton from the Drone club. Reeves turns out to be indispensable.

In the second story, “Something Rummy this way comes”, Aunt Bertha demands that Reggie will get married and sends him to all the dances of the season. Even feigning a heart attack doesn’t work. So, Reggie and Jeeves concoct plans to make Reggie less desirable in the eyes of the debutants and their family. However, soon Reggie dances with one Emmeline Dreadnought and finds out that several debutants have gone missing. Their families want to avoid a scandal and haven’t told the police. Reggie decides to become a consulting detective and investigate discreetly. Emmeline insists on helping him. Hilarity ensues.

Reggie has his own horseless carriage Stanley Steamer. Reeves is an automaton which occasionally needs his steam topped off. The setting is in England 1903 but Queen Victoria is still in charge. Secondary characters include Reggie’s friends from the Drone club and his mighty aunts as well as several other notable high society people.

This was highly entertaining story where it was easy for me to ignore the flaws, such as a ridiculous plot. Compared to Jeeves and Wooster, Reggie is stupider than Wooster and clearly less intelligent than Reeves and not very socially smart either. Reeves also suggests and uses subterfuge in a way that Jeeves wouldn’t. Of course, Dolley didn’t live in 1903, either.

This is a collection of three short steampunk novellas. I got an ebook in exchange for an honest review. The main character Maliha is a biracial woman and she needs a walking stick.

Format: ebook
Page count: 258

The year for the stories isn’t clearly stated until in the third novella. They take place during the reign of Edward II but in an alternate world where anti-gravity machines, called Faraday devices, have been invented and are used by the British Empire. Also, it seems that the British have gone to Venus and Mars which have at least plants.

Alice Maliha Anderson is the daughter of a high-born Indian lady and a Scottish engineer. Her family lives in India but Maliha has been sent to a boarding school in Britain. Unfortunately, the other girls made her life very unpleasant and her leg was also permanently injured during her school years so that she needs a cane to walk around. She’s a determined lady who has learned not to let anyone or anything stand in her way. But she’s keenly aware that she isn’t white enough to be British or dark enough to be Indian. She’s also very used to nobody wanting to even talk to her and keeping all people at an arm’s length. She’s a very proper Victorian woman with regards to personal relationships.

“Murder out of Blue” is the first novella where Maliha is finally returning home to India to her family via Ceylon. She travels by a flying ship which uses a Faraday device. That lessens the effects of gravity and allows her to walk without the cane. She travels in first class with a colorful company. At first, she’s keenly aware that everyone keeps an eye out on her but then she makes a few friends. However, then the body of one of the passengers is found murdered and much to her surprise, Maliha finds out that she’s also a suspect.

Another passenger urges Maliha to investigate; it seems that Maliha had solved another case earlier. Inspector Forsyth from Ceylon police department doesn’t want a woman messing in his case but he quickly realizes that she’s exceptionally perceptive. Maliha also meets Mr. William Crier who doesn’t appear to be intimidated by a strong woman.

The second novella, “Blood Sky at Night”, is set in Ceylon. A woman who Maliha knew at the boarding school is in trouble and she intends to contact Maliha for help. But before she can do so, she’s murdered. The woman’s pupil contacts Maliha instead. The pupil is a princess from a Bali royal line and the only survivor of a recent massacre. This time Inspector Forsyth and his deputy Detective Constable Choudhary can’t avoid Maliha getting involved in the case.

“Halo Around the Moon” is the third novella and it’s set mostly on Ceylon. One of Mr. Crier’s distant friends has died seemingly in a riding accident and he travels to the mainland of India for the funeral. He invites Maliha along because he wants to be sure that his young friend really died from an accident and because he wants to spend more time with the aloof and proper woman.

The novellas are entertaining and each novella gets better (and longer). None of them end in a cliffhanger and the first two can be read as a stand-alones. The short length means that the stories don’t have much space for red herrings, tough. They have romance only as a possible undercurrent, until the third novella. The stories have some non-hetero people and they also deal with racism and colonialism. The one thing the stories lack is humor. Maliha is always earnest and serious.

I enjoyed the stories even though sometimes the sentence structures are awkward (for example “The horse had leapt the fallen tree trunk without a problem and although there had been no pace adjustment but something had gone wrong.” “Both raised their hats as drew closer.”) and I would have liked to get more descriptions of people and places. Maliha is a delightful protagonist and the stories have a historical feel.

The next story, Wind in the East, seems to be a full-length novel.

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