Rinn provided stats about her science fiction reading 2015, inspiring me to do the same:
Note, I’m including here only novels. I also read three short story collections which had SF stories. The collections would change the stats even more towards multiple POVs.

Novels and collections read and reviewed: 89, science fiction novels: 29
13 of them were stand-alones, 16 part of a series including one Star Trek and one Farscape book. No a surprise here: I read a lot of series.
I also read four books from Edgar Rice Burroughs. I don’t include them as SF, but if you do, you can adjust: all are part of a series and all have male POV. I call them science fantasy but I should really outright call them fantasy.

Written by women: 16 and written by men: 13: Not really a surprise. One of my favorite SF authors, Kristine Kathryn Rusch, ended her long-running series (Anniversary Day) inside the Retrieval Artist SF series (by releasing many books just a couple of months apart) so I ended up reading from her six books in that series and one stand-alone. I also read the Quantum Thief trilogy from Hannu Rajaniemi but most of the other books written by male writers were stand-alones.

Single or multiple point-of-view character(s) who is/are male: 5
Single or multiple point-of-view character (s) who is/are female: 7
Multiple point-of-view characters, both male and female: 14
Not determined: 1 (John Scalzi’s “Lock in” where the POV character’s gender isn’t revealed)

Among the SF novels I read last year, a couple have only two POVs, one male and one female. However, the clear majority had multiple POV characters, in both genders.
I thought at first that it’s because six of them are in Rusch’s series and she uses lots of different POVs in her Retrieval Artist series but so do other writers I read last year. For example, Nancy Kress in her Probability series has both male and female POV characters and “The Quantum Thief” has three POVs, one female, two males. The rest of the series (“the Fractal Prince” and “the Causal Angel”) have many other POVs.

Out of 16 women authors, four had a female point-of-view character and three a male one. The rest, 9, had multiple POV characters from both genders.
Out of 13 male authors, three wrote from a female perspective, three from a male’s. The rest, 7, had both male and female point-of-view characters.

This year’s stats show the same trend, although my SF reading has gone down: only 17 SF novels so far (but at least a couple of more to come) out of 81. 10 were written by a female author and 7 by a male author. Only 5 books were stand-alones, the other 12 were part of a series, although five were the first ones in a series.

Single or multiple point-of-view character(s) who is/are male: 4
Single or multiple point-of-view character (s) who is/are female: 4
Multiple point-of-view characters, both male and female: 9

Again, the multiple POVs dominate. For example, Becky Chambers’ “The Long Way to the Small, Angry Planet” has lots of different POV characters and so does Karen Wyle’s “Leaders”.

Out of 10 women authors, two had a female point-of-view character and one a male one. The rest, 7, had multiple POV characters from both genders.
Out of 7 male authors, two wrote from a female perspective, three from a male’s. The rest had both male and female point-of-view characters.

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