The first book in the Vicky Bliss mystery series

Publication year: 1973
Page count: 244
Format: print
Publisher: Robinson

Vicky Bliss is a history teacher in a small Mid-western collage. When she finds out that a famous sixteenth century German woodcarver might have left behind an unknown masterpiece, she travels to Germany to find it. However, her obnoxious colleague and lover Tony Lawrence has the same clues and he challenges Vicki to a battle between the sexes. Vicki takes up the challenge, of course, and a third competitor joins the race: George Nolan who is a rich art collector and almost as arrogant as Tony. They all travel to Germany, separately, to the small old town where they think the carved alter is. They get rooms in the Drachenstein castle which has been changed into a hotel. However, the altar isn’t easy to find and they get involved in local trouble – which seems to include a ghost.

Vicky Bliss was born with genes which made her tall, voluptuous, and blond. She’s also got a degree in history but nobody takes her seriously because of her looks. She would like nothing else than to look like a traditional heroine: short, dark, and delicate. So, she’s sworn off marriage. She’s also adventurous, determined, smart, and independent. However, her lover at the start of the book, Tony, instantly declared that he wants to marry her and don’t care what she thinks. He’s also very competitive and yet has a fragile ego which Vicky has to nurse. I was hoping that Tony would be the murder victim promised on the cover, but no such luck. In fact, while this book is a mystery, there’s no current day murder so solve.

Since I’m a fan of Peters’ other series, I couldn’t help myself but to compare this book with the Amelia Peabody books. In fact, Vicky and Amelia have a lot in common being independent and smart women who have to put up with arrogant and overbearing men. However, Tony is a far cry from Emerson: Tone just doesn’t have the same charisma at all.

Vicky, Tony, and George are looking for the altar in Rothenburg. I loved the descriptions of the small town and if I had money, I’d be tempted to visit it. The woodcarver Riemenschneider was a real person and his carvings can be seen today. As far as I can tell, all the historical details in the story are correct and I love that. The trio wanders through the old castle looking for clues and find secret passageways and underground rooms! The setting and the background to the story were really appealing to me. However, especially in the beginning there are long passages about historical events which might be boring people who are less interested in history. Unfortunately, the plot is quite simple and there aren’t many suspects.

Unfortunately, I didn’t really care for Tony or Vicky’s second romantic interest; they’re far too arrogant and yet they tend to hog the scenes. The rest of the cast were more interesting. The old countess who runs the castle/hotel is a tough woman who ruthlessly exploits her young niece who does pretty much all of the work. The niece is beautiful and Tony immediately wants to help her.

A fun, quick read but a bit too predictable.

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