The fourteenth book in the Amelia Peabody series where she confronts nasty villains armed with her trusty parasol.

Publication year: 2003
Format: Audio
Publisher: Avon

The year 1917 has just started. The First World War is still raging but the Emersons and their entourage are traveling to Egypt. This time they are staying indefinitely because traveling between England and Egypt has become too dangerous. The Emersons are bringing with them their niece Sennia and their butler Gargary. This year, the Emersons have the permission to excavate in Luxor.

They have barely just started to settle into their house when things start to happen. First, Emerson’s half brother makes appearance in disguise and disappears swiftly, enraging Emerson. Then, they hear that tomb robbers have found a new, rich tomb. The Emersons’ old friends, the Vandergelts, managed to buy an object that seems to prove that a Queen’s tomb has indeed been found. Naturally, the Emersons’ want to save the tomb from the robbers.

However, they have to also deal with the fall-out from the problems they had the previous year. Jamala and her villainous brother Jamil return from the previous book. The man threatens to kill Ramses and Jamala is in a bad position. Her father has disowned her because she wants a life of her own and the Vandergelts are training her to become an Egyptologist. Her brother is also in contact with her and she feels that she has to protect him. Yet, she owes loyalty to the Emersons and the Vangerdelts, too. Also, Bertie seems to be smitten with her.

Meanwhile, the Army has again a dangerous mission to Ramses and his wife and parents aren’t happy about it.

Peters is in a fine form here. The book has a lot of humor, adventure, and mysteries. However, the mysteries surrounding the tomb take a back seat to Ramses’ adventures during the middle of the book. The book is again divided between Amelia’s first-person memoirs and document H which Ramses and his wife have written in third person.

The familiar cast of characters includes the Egyptian workers, Sethos, Vandergelts, and Catherine’s son Bertie, who was injured in the war. David and Lia don’t appear. There are some new characters as well, such as the Albions who are an American family who are out to “collect antiques” or rather rob everything they want which, of course, enrages Emerson.

There’s some Victorian double standards which Amelia and Nefret hold up; an (unmarried) woman shouldn’t be alone with a man or she gets what she’s asking for. On the other hand, I’m really surprised that this sort of teaching isn’t included in the Islamic upbringing that Jamala has. Or perhaps in Islamic culture, young women aren’t ever alone with young men, so there no need to tell women not to do it. Anyway, I found Jamala a bit too naïve for her own good but that apparently tended to be the norm with Victorian girls.

Overall, I enjoyed the book a great deal. The Americans were great foils to Emerson and even Ramses’ adventures were quite humorous and preposterous. (For me, his previous efforts in the war were a bit too serious with all the torture and arms dealing.) Also, courtship romance took a back seat to adventure.

I guess I must admit that I did listen to an abridged version.